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Archive for the ‘Peacebuilding’ Category


The land of the free is filled with more incarcerated citizens than any other country in the world.

General Colin Powell speaking at United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC

General Colin Powell speaking at United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC

General Colin Powell, speaking at an America’s Sunday Supper event in Washington, D.C., presented this hard fact along with a challenge: focus on what we want our nation to become…and back up those dreams with the education required to achieve our goals. America’s Sunday Supper is a nationwide movement to honor the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., through dialog about social issues followed by action. The D.C. event focused on education was held at the United States Institute of Peace, and featured Powell and his wife Alma who founded America’s Promise Alliance, dedicated to providing the essentials that children need to succeed and make our communities better. Those invited to this event were asked to focus on ways that their organizations could participate in increasing the graduation rate in the U.S., where one child drops out of school every 26 seconds. I was asked to attend on behalf of The United Methodist Church because of my leadership role in America’s Sunday Supper.

The Methodist tradition includes an historical reverence for education which has been expressed through the building and maintaining of educational facilities and institutions throughout the world. We adopt schools locally, and we enhance the quality of education globally with technology and human development projects. We have institutes of higher learning that are world renowned and credited with producing graduates who do amazing things with their lives. It is part of our essence as United Methodist Christians to promote the full use of one’s mind, which leads to a better life and improved communities.

As a deacon whose secondary appointment is in a church-of-the-poor setting, I see the difference that mentorship & tutoring can make – in children’s lives and for parents whose own education may be lacking. I left the event with these inspirations for our denomination:

  • After-school tutoring programs held at United Methodist churches herald the spirit of commitment to education long ago established in Methodism. These programs build bridges within community – getting volunteers from local colleges and universities involved in the lives of children and families. What if all United Methodist churches worked together to offer after-school tutoring?
  • Support groups are needed to increase parental commitment to schooling. Poverty self-perpetuates – with generation after generation remaining stuck in cycles that can only be broken through education within a greater community. What if United Methodist churches worked together to offer once-a-month listening sessions facilitated by social workers/community organizers? Then, the needs of parents could be heard by those closest to social services who could aid and encourage them.
  • With each year, school supplies become increasingly expensive and when children go without, they suffer from embarrassment and cannot meet school expectations. A partially-used Sunday school room or closet could be renovated and stocked with the help of local businesses. Parents could make donations as they’re able, pay what they can, and assist in managing the store. What if United Methodist churches offered the tools kids need to succeed?
  • Kids know what to do to get punished, but often don’t know what to do to get rewarded. Incentivize students to attend school and make good grades. For students who have perfect attendance, offer a pizza and movie night, bowling adventure or some other reward based on their likes. What if United Methodist churches helped to build pride in students to use their intellectual gifts fully?

General Colin Powell said, “Education is the civil rights struggle of our day.” After further research, I learned, “Dropouts are far more likely to become unemployed, receive public assistance, commit crimes, and become incarcerated. At the same time, they are less likely to receive job-based health insurance and pension plans, to stay healthy and live full lives, and to vote and make other kinds of civic contributions.” (Rouse 2005, Waldfogel et al. 2005, Muennig, 2005, Moretti 2005, and Junn 2005)

Methodism has been a very present force in social struggles through the years, and we can be part of the solution in high dropout rates in the U.S. Doing so will not only decrease incarceration rates, but bring forth the beloved community – the embodiment of our faith.

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America’s Sunday Supper is promoted as an annual Rethink Church event happening in January each year during the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Day of Service. Learn more about Rethink Church events at www.umcom.org/rethinkchurch.

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Years ago, I visited an art museum in Memphis, Tennessee – meandering about until I found an exhibit on the civil rights movement. I still remember how I felt reading about Dr. Martin Luther King’s “kitchen table” experience and how it set me on a path of striving to live with greater purpose. This is a story from his life that many haven’t heard.

In January of 1957, Dr. Martin Luther King struggled for courage to keep up the fight that would later become known as the civil rights movement. After having his life threatened, King went to his kitchen table and had a conversation with God – expressing his doubts as a leader and asking for guidance.

“I was ready to give up. With my cup of coffee sitting untouched before me, I tried to think of a way to move out of the picture without appearing a coward…The words I spoke to God that midnight are still vivid in my memory. ‘I am here taking a stand for what I believe is right. But now I am afraid…I’ve come to the point where I can’t face it alone.’

At that moment, I experienced the presence of the Divine as I had never experienced God before. It seemed as though I could hear the quiet assurance of an inner voice saying: ‘Stand up for justice, stand up for truth; and God will be at your side forever.’ Almost at once my fears began to go. My uncertainty disappeared. I was ready to face anything.” (Stride Toward Freedom)

The art exhibit featured a kitchen table with a coffee cup humbly displayed along with those words.  The table was simply made, but it echoed the holiness of communion – Christ at the table – feeding one who was hungry with something more than physical sustenance – the power to go on.

King’s table experience empowered him to feed others – to share a vision of something much larger than any one life – and to inspire others to fight for that something more. Elsewhere in the exhibit were pictures of lives lost and maimed, exposing the ugliness of humanity’s bent toward oppression. Yet that ugliness was diminished and overshadowed by the power to overcome, and it was that power that dominated my experience.

As I walked through the museum, I read another quote of Dr. King’s – one that is reflected today on the monument in Washington, DC:

“If you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice; say that I was a drum major for peace; I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter. I won’t have any money to leave behind. I won’t have the fine and luxurious things of life to leave behind. But I just want to leave a committed life behind.”

I left there thinking about life differently – I felt challenged to live a life that’s not as much concerned over personal welfare as much as leaving the world a better place. If you’ve ever had to clean out someone else’s stuff after they’ve died, you know that it’s not their material leftovers that matter – it’s the other leftovers of their life that count. These may be their ideas, their love, their way of being in community – all things you can’t measure with money. Kind of like crumbs of the soul left behind to feed generations to come. A committed life echoes and informs future generations to make life better – for the whole of creation.

King’s life showed the power of not just letting things lie, but that by taking risk together we can create the beloved community intended by God. There’s still so much to do in the world today – things that need to be discussed and acted upon by people committed to leaving leftovers from their lives that are worthy of consumption.

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